Coronavirus: new study addresses role of timely and effective national health surveillance

According to the researchers, the positive example of rapid notification and visualization channels implemented for the current outbreak, recognized as fundamental for timely responses, ought to be incorporated as standard practice in domestic epidemiological surveillance.
应用数学
17 三月 2020
Coronavirus: new study addresses role of timely and effective national health surveillance

Professor Flávio Codeço of the FGV´s School of Applied Mathematics (FGV EMAp) has just had an article published in the Public Health Journal of the Sergio Arouca National Public Health School (ENSP), which is part of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Titled “The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) emergency and the role of timely and effective national health surveillance,” this is one of the first studies published in Brazil about Covid-19.

According to the paper, which was written in partnership with Raquel Martins Lana, Marcelo Ferreira da Costa Gomes, Oswaldo Gonçalves Cruz, Leonardo Soares Bastos, Daniel Antunes Maciel Villela and Cláudia Torres Codeço, of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation’s Computer Science Program, the impending arrival of the new virus will put the country’s health surveillance infrastructure to the test.

“Brazil was a leader when it came to tackling the Zika epidemic, but it now needs to keep up with the knowledge generated abroad and prepare for specific studies and demands that will happen here, including in the areas of diagnosis, medical care, disease prevention and health promotion. Therefore, when the alert regarding the novel coronavirus was issued, once again Brazil was faced with a major question: are we prepared?” the article says.

The study’s main conclusion is that we need technologies to enable the more effective notification of diseases in the country. According to the researchers, the positive example of rapid notification and visualization channels implemented for the current outbreak, recognized as fundamental for timely responses, ought to be incorporated as standard practice in domestic epidemiological surveillance.

The complete study is available here