FGV project aims to repair and develop mechanical ventilators to treat coronavirus

Using the “Vasconcellos Lima” methodology to guide innovations for the rapid generation of added value, the Ventilate O2 group identified a couple of priorities to tackle the current pandemic, involving the swift deployment of mechanical ventilators to emergency rooms.
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04 五月 2020
FGV project aims to repair and develop mechanical ventilators to treat coronavirus

FGV is one of the partners in the Ventilate O2 project, which will help Brazilian hospitals fight the COVID-19 pandemic. The coordinator of FGV´s Executive Education Sao Paulo’s Innovation and Technology Management / Industry 4.0 course, Gustavo Peçanha Lacerda de Lima, has brought together students and specialists in the field, such as doctors, physiotherapists, mechanical and electronic engineers, and professionals from the Industry 4.0 Optimization Lab and IN@VA SCS Technology Hub, where the work is being done.

“We quickly assembled a group and we are following the methodology we use in the classroom for our course. Our knowledge of the industry’s latest developments in rapid manufacturing, rapid engineering and value assertiveness – the key strengths of our methodology – has been deployed from the very beginning. We set up a first-class medical committee in Sao Paulo with a lot of knowledge of this problem and its applications,” says Lima.

Using the “Vasconcellos Lima” methodology to guide innovations for the rapid generation of added value, the Ventilate O2 group identified the following two priorities to tackle the current pandemic, involving the swift deployment of mechanical ventilators to emergency rooms:

  1. The Ventilate O2 group is supporting the Breathe project, which is repairing unused equipment at hospitals and clinics and then sending it to emergency rooms where it is most needed. Last month, the group presented the Breathe project to the National Industrial Training Service (SENAI), which has a significant industrial capacity across the country. The organizations then formed a partnership to harness their synergies.
  2. The group is supplying mechanical ventilators to emergency rooms in a rapid, assertive cycle, structuring a manufacturing network that can produce new mechanical lung ventilators on a large scale.

To this end, the group is using OxiGEN’s open source project, which basically uses lasers to cut state-of-the-art acrylic and stainless steel, resulting in a short assembly lead time. IN@VA SCS’ electronics team developed a special remote monitoring panel to protect medical professionals during treatment and speed up alarms. Innovations were also made to the ventilator’s respiratory system, to filter breathed air and protect medical teams, including when performing conventional hospital treatments.

Trials were held at the Dante Pazzanese Institute using this prototype. Positive aspects of the design were identified, as well as important improvements desired by physiotherapists and doctors, who defined a high-priority functional sequence, as provided for in the FGV professors’ methodology. The technical team is also receiving information about the latest experiences and modifications to similar equipment in use in Spain and other countries, helping to make the Brazilian project safer and more assertive.

The main advantage of the OxiGEN-Ventilate O2 mechanical ventilation system is its low cost and fast production. The device is much cheaper than a traditional one and easy to make, including in remote locations. To facilitate its manufacture, the team will produce an augmented reality digital tutorial explaining how to assemble and use it. As a result, it will be possible to produce it quickly in different locations, helping hospitals across Brazil.

The entire project is taking place on a nonprofit basis. Its professionals are working as volunteers in order to aid the Brazilian health system. The group now hopes to attract sponsorship to further develop the project and its production capacity.