​​​​​​​New books tackle debts of emerging countries and slavery in Brazil

The launch of the books “Sovereign Debt Crises and Negotiations in Brazil and Mexico, 1888-1914” and “The Trade in the Living: The Formation of Brazil in the South Atlantic, Sixteenth to Seventeenth Centuries” will be held in the EESP sixth-floor auditorium (Rua Itapeva, 474. Bela Vista, Sao Paulo/SP).
经济学
26 十一月 2018
​​​​​​​New books tackle debts of emerging countries and slavery in Brazil

On November 27, at 4 p.m., FGV’s Sao Paulo School of Economics (EESP) will host the launch of the following books: “Sovereign Debt Crises and Negotiations in Brazil and Mexico, 1888-1914” and “The Trade in the Living: The Formation of Brazil in the South Atlantic, Sixteenth to Seventeenth Centuries”. The event will be held in the EESP sixth-floor auditorium (Rua Itapeva, 474. Bela Vista, Sao Paulo/SP).

Written by EESP professor Leonardo Weller, “Sovereign Debt Crises and Negotiations in Brazil and Mexico, 1888-1914” addresses the relative balance of bargaining power between governments and the banks in charge of subscribing their debts during the first financial globalization. Brazil and Mexico, both debtor countries that suffered major changes in reputation and in their bargaining power when facing financial crises, provide valuable case studies on government strategies to obtain the best possible results.

“The Trade in the Living: The Formation of Brazil in the South Atlantic, Sixteenth to Seventeenth Centuries” is a study of the South Atlantic over the 16th and 17th centuries, showing how the emergence of Brazil was built on the longest and most intense slave trade in the modern age. Written by professor Luiz Felipe de Alencastro (EESP), the book demonstrates how the African slave trade was an essential element in the region and the cohesion of Portuguese America, while the concrete interests of the Brazilian colonists, who depended on Angolan slaves, were often violently affirmed in Africa, in order to ensure that men and goods continued to move across the Atlantic. By exposing this complex and complementary relationship between two non-European continents, the author made a new and challenging analysis of colonial Brazil, which goes beyond its relationship with Portugal, to find a darker, more hidden story.

Go to the website to learn more about the book launches.