Brazil’s low productivity is systemic

  • Brazil’s low productivity is systemic
    Resumo

    The study concludes that per capita income is strongly correlated with total productivity and sector productivity. Out of the countries that were examined, the most productive is the United States (six times more productive than Brazil), followed by Ireland, France, Canada and Australia. Brazil was found to be less productive than developed countries and also less productive on average than countries with similar per capita income. The study helps to explain Brazil’s low productivity, showing that the allocation of employment in unproductive sectors is important, but not as much as low productivity in different sectors. Although there are potential gains from reallocating workers to more productive sectors, Brazil’s overall low productivity mainly results from the low productivity of each of its sectors. In other words, it is a systemic problem that is not associated with specific sectors.

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Autor

  • Fernando Veloso

    He holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Brasília (1989), a Master's degree in Economics from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (1993) and a PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago (1999). He is currently a member of the editorial board of Economic Research and Planning (Rio de Janeiro), a reviewer of the Journal of Economic Research and Planning (Rio de Janeiro), a reviewer of the Brazilian review of econometrics, a reviewer of the Brazilian Journal of Economics (print), Reviewer of the Journal of Applied Economics, Reviewer of Economics Studies (USP) and Researcher at Fundação Getulio Vargas. Has experience in Economics, with an emphasis on Growth, Fluctuations and Economic Planning. Acting mainly in the following areas: fecundity, wealth distribution, growth model, human capital, intergenerational mobility.

  • Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira

    He holds a bachelor's and master's degree in Economics from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania (1993). Since 1993, he has been a professor at FGV’s EPGE Brazilian School of Economics and Finance (FGV EPGE). His main research area is Growth and Economic Development, working mainly in the following areas: growth and income differences between countries; effects of public policy - trade barriers, infrastructure, taxation, etc. - on growth, total factor productivity and per capita output; and longevity and education. Recently, he has worked with dynamic macroeconomic models with heterogeneity among agents to study retirement, health issues and income inequality and wealth. He has also conducted research on regional economics (migration and income dispersion between Brazilian states and regions) and industrial policy.

  • Silvia Matos

    She holds a Master’s and PhD in Economics from FGV’s EPGE Brazilian School of Economics and Finance (FGV EPGE), and a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the State University of Campinas (1995). Former economist at the Research Department of Banco BBM. Professor of the Professional Master in Economics at FGV EPGE and technical coordinator of the IBRE Macro Bulletin (FGV’s Brazilian Institute of Economics).

  • Bernardo Coelho

    Researcher at FGV’s Brazilian Institute of Economics (FGV IBRE), holds a PhD and Bachelor’s degree in Economics from FGV’s EPGE Brazilian School of Economics and Finance (FGV EPGE). Interest in topics related to sector productivity.