Artificial intelligence in the judiciary and its role in implementing UN Agenda 2030

According to the survey, around half of Brazil’s courts have an artificial intelligence project under development or already in place.
Law
13 July 2021
 Artificial intelligence in the judiciary and its role in implementing UN Agenda 2030

Agenda 2030 is a global commitment undertaken within the scope of the United Nations, stipulating a set of goals to be achieved by the end of this decade, with a view to eradicating poverty, protecting the planet and ensuring prosperity for all. Based on these three pillars, there are 17 main sustainable development goals, which require broad commitment from governments, the private sector, civil society and citizens. The judiciary plays a fundamental role in achieving these goals by encouraging greater access to justice. In this context, several Brazilian courts have created innovation and intelligence labs, according to a survey by Fundação Getulio Vargas’ Center for Judicial Innovation, Administration and Research (CIAPJ) and FGV Knowledge.

The nationwide survey, carried out in 2020, looked at the use of artificial intelligence by the Federal Supreme Court, Superior Court of Appeals, Superior Labor Court, regional labor courts, regional federal courts and courts of appeals. The survey provides an unprecedented picture of artificial intelligence projects in different stages: under development, pilot projects and implemented.

According to the survey, around half of Brazil’s courts have an artificial intelligence project under development or already in place, mostly run by internal teams, and sometimes through partnerships led by the National Justice Council and Superior Labor Court Council. The data presented in the report makes it possible to verify the development of artificial intelligence systems, which are considered a great ally for increasing the productivity of the Brazilian judiciary. The survey also identifies important investments aimed at automating some activities.

“The main objectives of artificial intelligence in Brazilian courts are optimization of public services, better management of human resources in the judiciary’s core activities and faster processes,” says Justice Luis Felipe Salomão of the Superior Court of Appeals, who is also CIAPJ’s coordinator, in an article published in Conjur.

Regarding new technologies, the survey found that they increase productivity and quality, manage scarcity over the long term and are now essential tools for managing courts. AI tools can be used in the justice system for various purposes, such as searching for advanced jurisprudence, online dispute resolution, predictive decision analysis, process screening, grouping by similarity of jurisprudence, context-based transcription of audio to text and semi-automatic generation of documents.

According to Justice Salomão, the construction of these systems is significant, as the aim is to give professionals outside the field of computing, particularly legal specialists, practical understanding of operational aspects of these technology tools, allowing better assessments of these machines with regard to their performance, their advantages in terms of speed and effectiveness of legal procedures, and how they are compatible with the work of the judiciary’s employees.

The report, titled “Technology Applied to Conflict Management in the Brazilian Judiciary, Emphasizing Artificial Intelligence,” is available on CIAPJ’s website.

 

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