Brazilians believe 2018 elections could pull the country out of the crisis, survey revealsBrazilians believe 2018 elections could pull country out of crisis, survey reveals
Public Policy
11 October 2017

Brazilians believe 2018 elections could pull country out of crisis, survey reveals

A public survey conducted by FGV’s Department of Public Policy Analysis (DAPP) in August shows that Brazilians’ dissatisfaction currently leads to a widespread lack of confidence in the Presidency (83%), politicians (78%) and political parties (78%), across all geographical, age and income ranges.

A public survey conducted by FGV’s Department of Public Policy Analysis (DAPP) in August shows that Brazilians’ dissatisfaction currently leads to a widespread lack of confidence in the Presidency (83%), politicians (78%) and political parties (78%), across all geographical, age and income ranges. On the other hand, Brazilians are mostly optimistic about the future – 54% of interviewees consider that the overall quality of life will improve over the next five years. The collection of field information, performed by Ibope, covered 1,568 interviewees from different municipalities across Brazil.

The goal of the study was to understand which values guide the choices and preferences of individuals today and in the future, focusing on the topic of confidence to guide the analysis and discussion of data collected on the field. The survey is divided into two stages: the first one, called “Confidence in Brazil”, analyzes Brazilians’ level of confidence regarding politics, economy and social structure in general, cross-referencing these variables to their future expectations for themselves and for society in general. The second stage is called “The Brazilian Heart” and focuses on Brazilians’ behavior towards a wide range of issues regarding our social structure.

“Everything points toward an election that will be a turning point in Brazilian politics, like many few others before. Brazil hasn’t been able to reach a consensus, except when it comes to distrusting the political system and its players. Therefore, the stage has been set for 2018, when the score will finally be settled. In other words, which direction will the country take? What kind of political structure will lead it towards that direction? And what can expect for Brazil’s future?” said DAPP director, Marco Aurelio Ruediger.

In general terms, Brazilians are still quite polarized in their perceptions and convictions. However, there are some common grounds: they don’t deny the crucial role of the government to solve social inequalities, besides improving the economy and ensuring basic utility services, such as healthcare, security and education, but they don’t want the government to meddle in other areas.

“Even if Brazilians’ current assessment of the country is based on a worst-case-scenario, prospects for the next five years are very optimistic. This is good on the one hand, but highly problematic on the other, since it will place enormous pressure over next year’s election and whoever is elected, who will be held liable for all of these built-up frustrations and expected to fix the country’s disjointed and faulty system. And if the new administration is unable to live up to such Herculean task, the following president will face a colossal crisis after a couple of years”, said Ruediger.

Go to the website to read the complete study, available in Portuguese.

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