Oscar Vilhena Vieira participates in debate on rise of “illiberal democracies”

“The rise of illiberal populist leaders around the world has imposed an enormous stress test on liberal institutions", Vilhena Vieira says.
Law
08 June 2021
 Oscar Vilhena Vieira participates in debate on rise of “illiberal democracies”

Oscar Vilhena Vieira, the dean of Fundação Getulio Vargas’ Sao Paulo Law School, will take part in a seminar called “Illiberal Democracy on the Rise: Examining Brazil, Hungary & India” on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. The online meeting is being organized by the Carnegie Council.

The event will also feature Gábor Halmai, a professor of comparative constitutional law at the European University Institute in Florence; Prerna Singh, Mahatma Gandhi Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Brown University; and Joel Rosenthal, the president of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs.

“The rise of illiberal populist leaders around the world has imposed an enormous stress test on liberal institutions. In many countries, such as Venezuela, Hungary and Poland, these institutions have given way to authoritarianism. In others, such as Brazil, although there has clearly been a setback, there are still robust control mechanisms. Debating the Brazilian case in light of international experience, it is essential to better understand and describe the mechanisms for defending democracy and liberal institutions,” Vilhena Vieira says.

The term “illiberal democracy” was coined by journalist Fareed Zakaria in an article published in 1997 in Foreign Affairs, a U.S. magazine, to describe regimes that seemingly follow the rules of democracy but also have rules restricting human and social rights. Venezuela, Hungary and Poland may be put in this category, which can also be called “autocratic regimes.”

In 2014, the Hungarian prime minister, Viktor Okban, gave a speech defending the idea that illiberal democracy could be an alternative to liberal democracy and help promote Europe’s return to Christian values. In 2019, he made another speech reinforcing this idea.

 

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