Studies on women’s leadership and the work environment win awards at international conference

“The Queen Bee” investigates the effect of women’s leadership on gender differences at public and private sector organizations. In “I Shot the Sheriff,” Alcadipani explores the dissemination of the lean management concept.
Administration
09 September 2019
Studies on women’s leadership and the work environment win awards at international conference

Two articles by FGV´s Sao Paulo School of Business Administration professors were chosen as the best papers of the year by the journals in which they appeared and they won awards during the annual meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM), held between August 9 and 13 in Boston, United States. Paulo Arvate and Gisele Galilea won an award from The Leadership Quarterly for “The Queen Bee: a myth? The effect of top-level female leadership on subordinate females,” developed together with master’s student Isabela Todescat. Rafael Alcadipani was recognized by the Journal of Management Studies for “I shot the sheriff: irony, sarcasm and the changing nature of workplace resistance,” written in partnership with John Hassar of the University of Manchester and Gazi Islam of the Grenoble School of Management.

The Queen Bee” investigates the effect of women’s leadership on gender differences at public and private sector organizations. The impact was measured in a quasi-experiment involving mayoral elections, drawing on a sample of 8.3 million organizations distributed across 5,600 Brazilian municipalities. The results show that municipalities run by women mayors (treatment group) had more public sector female managers with high school diplomas and university degrees than municipalities run by male mayors (control group).

In “I Shot the Sheriff,” Alcadipani explores the dissemination of the lean management concept. The paper suggests that coercive systems have proliferated and asks whether lean management is synonymous with cost cutting and new forms of domination, even though it often portrays itself as an approach based on “human relationships.” The study also argues that different forms of domination that emerge during lean management programs stimulate specific reactions among workers, which are explained through fieldwork illustrations.