Guidelines for large infrastructure projects in the Amazon

  • Guidelines for large infrastructure projects in the Amazon
    Author
    • Mario Monzoni

      PhD in Public Administration and Government from FGV’s Sao Paulo School of Business Administration (FGV EAESP). Master in Economic Policy Management from the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), New York, USA. Master in Public Finance from FGV EAESP. Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration from FGV EAESP. Specializing in Sustainability and Environmental Economics, Mario is a professor at FGV EAESP and coordinator of the Center for Sustainability Studies (GVces) at FGV EAESP. He has worked with the World Bank's Research Department.

    • Carolina Derivi

      Researcher of the Center for Sustainability Studies (FGVces) at FGV’s Sao Paulo School of Business Administration (FGV EAESP).

    • Daniela Gomes Pinto

      Graduated in Geology from USP, in Journalism from PUC-SP and holds a Master’s in Environment and Development from London School of Economics and Political Science. She has experience in the area of development and environment, territorial governance and local development in the context of major infrastructure works and environmental licensing.

    • Graziela Azevedo

      She holds a master's degree and a degree in Public Administration from FGV’s Sao Paulo School of Business Administration (FGV EAESP) (2012 and 2010), focusing on local development and social participation in the Amazon. She is currently a researcher at FGV’s Center for Sustainability Studies (FGVces).

    • Kena Chaves

      Holds a Bachelor Degree in Geography from Unicamp (2010). Specialist in Public Management and Society from UFT-SENAES - GAPI UNICAMP. Currently studying for a master's degree in geography at UNESP/Rio Claro and is a researcher at FGV’s Center for Sustainability Studies (GVces).

    • Marcos Dal Fabbro

      Researcher at FGV’s Center for Sustainability Studies (FGVces) of the Sao Paulo School of Business Administration (FGV EAESP).

Summary

In order to construct guidelines for public policies and business practices in the context of the implementation and operation of large infrastructure projects in the Amazon, the research paper titled “Guidelines for large infrastructure projects in the Amazon” was based on a review of the literature, interviews, case studies, analysis of best practices, and recommendations on subjects discussed by six working groups.

Spaces for mobilization and liaison were also created, involving nearly 350 people representing more than 130 institutions, including companies, the financial sector, the government and civil society.

Guidelines for the following were delineated: regional planning, complementing measures and initiatives now led by environmental licensing, taking into account different visions of impacted regions; a proposal for financial instruments able to inject prior resources into broadly structured investments and to connect them to a long-term legacy, contributing to governance and transparency in resource management; mapping of stakeholders and institutional capacities to be strengthened; protection of children, adolescents and women; protection of the rights of indigenous peoples, traditional communities and communities of descendants of runaway slaves; and the allocation and use of forest materials arising from authorized vegetation removal.

These guidelines point to concrete paths in the field of self-regulation for enterprising companies, construction firms and consultancies to innovate in their practices. In the public sector, these guidelines will stimulate discussion of fundamental instruments in the area, namely regional planning and the use of existing channels (and others to be created) for the collective construction of agendas and strengthening of capacities, as well as monitoring of compliance with laws. For civil society, the guidelines pave the way for increasing its participation in regional planning decisions in the context of large construction projects.