Book features unpublished letters exchanged between Getúlio Vargas and his daughter Alzira
Social Sciences
14 September 2018

Book features unpublished letters exchanged between Getúlio Vargas and his daughter Alzira

The letters were written in the period when Getúlio distanced himself from power. Deposed in October 1945, the former President went to São Borja, Rio Grande do Sul, while Alzira remained in Rio de Janeiro.

A set of 568 previously unpublished letters exchanged between former President Getúlio Vargas and his daughter Alzira Vargas, between 1946 and 1950, make up the book “Volta ao Poder – A correspondência entre Getúlio Vargas e a filha Alzira (1946-1950)” [Return to Power – correspondence between Getúlio Vargas and his daughter Alzira (1946-1950)], co-edited by FGV Press and Editora Ouro sobre Azul. Distributed throughout the 1,650 pages that make up the publication’s two volumes, the correspondence belongs to Alzira Vargas’ archive, donated to the Center for Research and Documentation of the Contemporary History of Brazil of FGV’s School of Social Sciences (CPDOC).

The letters were written in the period when Getúlio distanced himself from power. Deposed in October 1945, the former President went to São Borja, Rio Grande do Sul, while Alzira remained in Rio de Janeiro. Even with the distance, they both kept in touch constantly for five years. Alzira went on to mediate family issues while she organized Getúlio’s return to power in 1950, elected democratically by direct vote.

The content of the messages varied from very intimate requests, such as cigars, medication, magazines and clothing, to political themes, such as partisan compositions, candidacies, positions and attitudes of political supporters and enemies. One of the most historically valuable letters is dated October 3, 1950, when Alzira told her father about the state of the elections on that day. That was the first time she voted.

“Gê

I’ve just arrived from Niterói, where I voted for the first time. Despite the rumors, threats and pessimistic predictions, the election went smoothly in the District. Abstention was high at over 30%, according to the hurried calculations of the experts.

I took advantage of this courier to send you cigars, soap, pasta, clippings of the campaign and this special issue we published at Wainer’s suggestion and with his collaboration, as well as that of Almir, Galvão, myself etc., in three newspapers: Radical, Folha and Diário Popular. The one I’m sending you came out the best.

Let’s wait for the results now.

With love from your daughter Alzira”

Organized by CPDOC coordinators Adelina Novaes e Cruz and Regina da Luz Moreira, the work contains an important collection for the understanding of what took place at that time in Brazil. In addition to the full transcripts of the letters, the book includes a previously unpublished text by literary critic and sociologist Antonio Candido (Prós e contras [Pros and cons]) and hundreds of pictures – including letters, pamphlets and photographs from CPDOC’s collection.

Go to the website for more information on the book.