New book discusses the origins of the Brazilian Anti-Terrorism Act

The author, Guilherme France, is the researcher of the Center for Justice and Society (CJUS) of FGV’s Rio de Janeiro Law School (Direito Rio)
Institutional
28 February 2019
New book discusses the origins of the Brazilian Anti-Terrorism Act

On March 16, 2016, the then Brazilian President, Dilma Rousseff, signed bill No. 13.260/2016, known as the Brazilian Anti-Terrorism Act. But why would Brazil need a law of this kind? This intriguing question is answered by the researcher of the Center for Justice and Society (CJUS) of FGV’s Rio de Janeiro Law School (Direito Rio), Guilherme France, who has just launched the book titled “As origens da Lei Antiterrorismo no Brasil”, under the Letramento publisher.

According to the author, in order to unravel the origins of this law, we must look beyond Brazil’s borders, while also recognizing that the country’s historical experiences in the last 50 years determined how international anti-terrorism standards would ultimately make their way into Brazil.

The origins of this law also have a lot to do with the relationship between the State and social movements and political disputes among agencies such as the Ministry of Justice, Armed Forces, Federal Police and the Federal Prosecution Service. They also reveal the trials and errors of the legislative process in Brazilian Congress.

This important narrative, which began in the author’s Master’s thesis at FGV’s School of Social Sciences (CPDOC), was built over dozens of unpublished documents and interviews with important names in the legislative process behind the Anti-Terrorism Act, in order to clarify not only why this law came to be, but also how it can affect the future of the country.

Go to the website for more information on the book.